Baby is not walking yet!

Baby is not walking yet!

Baby not walking yet? Not to worry, there is a broad spectrum of the developmental period that they could fall into! The first information you need to know is how your baby learns to walk. Newborns don’t have nearly enough strength to support their growing body, they use reflexive techniques (such as stretching out like a scarecrow!) against hard surfaces. But this is a development phase and they will only do it for a couple of months. As your baby grows, they reach an age (typically around the six month period) where they LOVE to bounce. Bouncing stimulates the muscles that are continuing to develop while s/he is mastering other skills like rolling over, sitting up and crawling. At the age of 9 months (approx.) your baby will probably start skills that play with your heart strings like pulling himself up on anything and everything he can, this will likely end in a few crashes, lots of tears and even more ‘get better’ kisses. Next, comes bending their knees and learning to sit after standing (tougher than you would think!). Around 12 months of age is when furniture “surfing” begins, walking along anything that can assist with stability (it’s a plus if it tastes good too, mmmm couch!) maybe even a few unassisted...
Back to school – How much should I pack my backpack

Back to school – How much should I pack my backpack

BACKPACK 101 It’s your favourite time of year; back to school season! The kids have got all their new pens, pencils, notebooks and art supplies in their new backpack and soon it’ll be filled with new course. Did you know that the average 6th grader’s backpack weighs 18 ½ pounds?! Anyone, young or old, should not regularly carry a backpack that is more than 10%-20% their body weight. Do the math and you might see that your kids are carrying a really heavy load. It is important to be aware of how much they’re carrying and how they’re wearing their backpacks.  Chiropractor Calgary, suggest that improper backpack weight and carry can lead to number of concerns, including postural issues, muscle strain, back & neck pain, headaches Here are a few great tips for finding the right backpack: – Make sure weight is evenly distributed when loading stuff in there – ALWAYS use both shoulder straps – Shoulder straps should fit snugly; you should still be able to slip a hand between the back – Top of the backpack shouldn’t be above the shoulder line – Bottom of the backpack shouldn’t hang below the hips If you’re just super keen and you simply must carry a heavy course load regularly, buy a backpack that has hip supports. By using a hip strap you can lessen the amount of weight strain on your back & shoulders by 50%-70. For those who carry purses, handbags and shoulder bags to work or the office we also suggest you limit the amount of weight you’re carrying. Only carry essentials because carrying a weighty bag on...
Walk Into a Better You

Walk Into a Better You

Walk Into a Better You The average adult is sedentary for 69% of their waking day. Being sedentary and inactive is the second leading preventable cause of death in North America. Knowing these facts, don’t you want to do something to take control of your life? It can really be as simple as walking. We all know that exercise is the key to many of the benefits of good health, but sometimes the task of joining a gym or finding the motivation to get into high intensity training is all too daunting. We see our neighbours out there running and we know we should be too but it seems too hard! Here’s the simple answer: just walk. If you start walking every day you will be able to start reaping some of the exercise benefits. We’ve outlined here some of the big changes you’ll experience.   Walking is excellent for the brain. Studies have shown that walking increases the area of brain activity which can positively affect memory, attention and decision-making skills. Walking is an excellent mood booster and it gives us time to think. People who walk regularly reported 47% reduction in depression symptoms; they felt they had gained more control over their lives. There’s also an added bonus to walking in wooded areas and natural pathways. Walking out amongst nature has been clinically proven to reduce stress, it also alleviates symptoms of ADD and has even been shown to increase the levels of anti-cancer protein cells! Walking just 1km a day can lower your chance of Alzheimer’s by 35%. Get those feet moving for your brain’s sake!...
Why Active Isolated Stretching is Good for Everyone

Why Active Isolated Stretching is Good for Everyone

A Detailed Look at Active Isolated Stretching Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) trains your body and mind to accept a greater range of motion and flexibility in a safe and controlled manner. It’s often associated to athletes and active people, but AIS has been proven to help inactive people maintain healthy movement too. Unlike traditional stretching where you hold a stretch from anywhere between 10 and 30 seconds, AIS has you going into a stretch that is slightly deeper than what you might feel is comfortable – and holding it for 2 seconds only. This reprograms your body and mind to remember new ranges of motion, while improving your muscle flexibility and strength. Beyond this, AIS techniques are designed to support and work through the whole spectrum of muscles in a particular area – including those responsible for rotating, bending, extending and flexing – so that you don’t focus only on those that are most frequently used. How Active Isolated Stretching Works Your muscles have two basic actions: they can either contract or relax. When your body feels as though a particular movement is going to hurt it, a protective mechanism called the stretch (mytatic) reflex kicks in. This stretch reflex is normally triggered in the muscle at about 3 seconds. It makes sense that only relaxed muscle tissue can stretch to its maximum length, so by holding stretches for under 3 seconds, the muscle’s protective reflex to contract isn’t triggered and it has the chance to stretch to its full length. Repetition of the movement trains the body and mind to accept this new range of motion without signaling...
Winter Running in Calgary

Winter Running in Calgary

There are two kinds of winter runners: the kind who is not intimidated by chilly conditions, and the kind whose attempts to go running are headed off by more important matters, like watching paint dry. Well, it doesn’t really matter whether you’re one or the other because these tips we’ve put together will benefit you regardless. Here’s how to make Winter Running in Calgary a little easier: Know that winter running in Calgary is about maintenance – not speed. Don’t set unreasonable expectations. If you’re dealing with a really cold day, break your usual 6 mile run into two short 3 mile runs so you can avoid getting cold. Really consider what’s on your feet. You want to really invest in a running shoe that has all-weather protection. We suggest a running shoe with a Gore-Tex membrane so that you can enjoy a waterproof yet breathable shoe that keeps your feet dry. You’ll also want something that has a rugged outsole that is equally efficient on the road and trail. Wear socks that wick away wetness but keep your feet warm. You may also want an over-the-ankle cut to bridge any gap between your pant leg and shoe. Think about layers and vents when you’re getting dressed for a cold weather run. The rule of thumb for winter running in Calgary is to dress as if it is 15 degrees warmer. You want be warm, but you don’t want to sweat too much as that may lead to getting the chills. Think layers of technical fabrics to wick sweat – with zippers at the neck and underarm area so...

Formulas for Finding Your Personal Heart Rate

Step 1: Determine you Maximal Heart Rate A common forumla you may see floating around is this:  (HRmax) is 220 – age = HRmax HOWEVER: this is neither accurate nor scientific. Current studies indicate that no formula currently exists that is an accurate predictor of HRmax. however, the least objectionable formula is this: HRmax = 205.8 − (0.685 × age) Many heart rate measuring devices exist. Some people simply count their pulse rates. Step 2: Calculate your resting heart rate (HRrest) This is found by taking your pulse (or using your heart rate monitor) as soon as you wake up. The general standard is to do this for three consecutive mornings and calculate the average. HRrest = resting heart rate day 1 + resting heart rate day 2 +  resting heart rate day 3  / 3   Step 3: Calculate reserve heart rate (HRreserve) To calculate your reserve heart rate, use this formula: HRreserve = HRmax – HRrest As your fitness improves, your resting heart rate will decrease thus increasing the reserve heart rate. Step 4: Calculating your target heart rate HRtarget= (HRreserve x  % intensity) + HRrest For example, if you want to target a 70% intensity, you would use: HRtarget= (HRreserve x .7) +...