Baby is not walking yet!

Baby is not walking yet!

Baby not walking yet? Not to worry, there is a broad spectrum of the developmental period that they could fall into! The first information you need to know is how your baby learns to walk. Newborns don’t have nearly enough strength to support their growing body, they use reflexive techniques (such as stretching out like a scarecrow!) against hard surfaces. But this is a development phase and they will only do it for a couple of months. As your baby grows, they reach an age (typically around the six month period) where they LOVE to bounce. Bouncing stimulates the muscles that are continuing to develop while s/he is mastering other skills like rolling over, sitting up and crawling. At the age of 9 months (approx.) your baby will probably start skills that play with your heart strings like pulling himself up on anything and everything he can, this will likely end in a few crashes, lots of tears and even more ‘get better’ kisses. Next, comes bending their knees and learning to sit after standing (tougher than you would think!). Around 12 months of age is when furniture “surfing” begins, walking along anything that can assist with stability (it’s a plus if it tastes good too, mmmm couch!) maybe even a few unassisted...
Walk Into a Better You

Walk Into a Better You

Walk Into a Better You The average adult is sedentary for 69% of their waking day. Being sedentary and inactive is the second leading preventable cause of death in North America. Knowing these facts, don’t you want to do something to take control of your life? It can really be as simple as walking. We all know that exercise is the key to many of the benefits of good health, but sometimes the task of joining a gym or finding the motivation to get into high intensity training is all too daunting. We see our neighbours out there running and we know we should be too but it seems too hard! Here’s the simple answer: just walk. If you start walking every day you will be able to start reaping some of the exercise benefits. We’ve outlined here some of the big changes you’ll experience.   Walking is excellent for the brain. Studies have shown that walking increases the area of brain activity which can positively affect memory, attention and decision-making skills. Walking is an excellent mood booster and it gives us time to think. People who walk regularly reported 47% reduction in depression symptoms; they felt they had gained more control over their lives. There’s also an added bonus to walking in wooded areas and natural pathways. Walking out amongst nature has been clinically proven to reduce stress, it also alleviates symptoms of ADD and has even been shown to increase the levels of anti-cancer protein cells! Walking just 1km a day can lower your chance of Alzheimer’s by 35%. Get those feet moving for your brain’s sake!...

Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is a repetitive stress injury of the outside (lateral) side of the upper arm near the elbow. When the muscles and tendons in the elbow area are used over and over again, small tears develop in the tendon. Over time, this leads to irritation and pain where the tendon is attached to the bone. Activities that can trigger tennis elbow include (but are not limited to) racquet sports, movements that involve repetitive twisting of the wrist, and repetitive work with a keyboard and mouse. Symptoms of Tennis Elbow Pain, especially over the outside area of the elbow to the forearm and back of the hand, that worsens when grasping or twisting A weak grasp Pain with wrist movement Treatments for Tennis Elbow Rest to the area Hot/Cold therapy Stretching and strengthening with home exercises Active Release Technqiues Massage Therapy Active Isolated Stretching Prevention of Tennis Elbow Perform the appropriate warm ups before physical activity and sports, as well as proper cool down stretches Be sure that your technique in these activities is evaluated for possible factors attributing to tennis elbow, so that you may avoid repetitive stress on your joints If using any kind of sports or work equiment that has a handle or strings, ensure that they are the appropriate size and weight for you to avoid extra stress on your elbow When treating any symptoms of tennis elbow, evaluating how often you perform the attributing physical activity can have an impact on your healing time...
Rotator Cuff Injuries

Rotator Cuff Injuries

A rotator cuff injury is a strain or a tear in the group of four muscles (Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, Subscapularis, and Teres Mino) that help reinforce the shoulder joint, increase its stability, and allow for smooth overhead motions of the arm. Tearing your rotator cuff can be a result from repetitive moments, lifting heavy objects, or impact.   Symptoms of a Rotator Cuff Injury Arm and shoulder pain Weakness through the arm, shoulders and neck Limited range of motion in shoulder movements, especially in overhead movements Treatments for a Rotator Cuff Injury Stretching and strengthening exercises at home Chiropractic Care Active Release Technqiues Massage Therapy Active Isolated...
Carpel Tunnel Syndrome

Carpel Tunnel Syndrome

The nerve responsible for providing feeling and movement to the “thumb side” of your hand is called the median nerve. The area in your wrist where the median enters the hand is called the carpal tunnel. This tunnel is narrow, so any swelling can pinch the nerve and cause pain, numbness, weakness, pain up to the elbow, or tingling. Repetitive motions of the hand and wrist can trigger carpal tunnel syndrome. These motions include: Typing Writing Painting Playing musical instruments Playing sports Sewing Driving Assembly line work Use of hand tools Treatments for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Active Release Techniques have been highly effective for treating carpal tunnel syndrome. The reason this works so well is because the techniques specifically target abnormalities in the tissue (in this case, the tissue that directly affects the carpal tunnel) by combining precisely direction tention with very specific patient movements to achieve a “release” in the muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments and nerves. Contemporary Medical Acupuncture improves circulation and muscle nutrition to problem areas, as well as helps restore muscle strength and decrease pain through nerve communication at many levels of the central nervous system. You may also be directed to try to wear a splint for several weeks, along with hot/cold compresses to try to control the swelling. Occassionally, surgery is suggested....
Sciatica

Sciatica

Sciatica is a condition in which the sciatic nerve – which is the largest nerve in the body – is irritated. The pain associated most with this usually stems from the lower back to behind the thigh, sometimes radiating as far down as the knee.     Symptoms of Sciatica The most common symptom is the sensation of burning, tingling, or a shooting pain from the buttocks and down the back of one leg – sometimes to the foot. This is usually worse when: Sitting Standing up Coughing Sneezing Straining Treatments for Sciatica Hot/Cold therapy Stretching and strengthening exercises at home Ultrasound therapy Muscle stimulation Active Release Technqiues Massage Therapy Active Isolated Stretching Chiropractic Care It should be noted that prolonged best rest is NOT adviced, as this may further weaken your muscles and slow the healing process. Instead, it is generally suggested that you stay active in ways that do not further promote discomfort or pain. Preventing Recurring Bouts of Sciatica Practice good posture, as this can help reduce the pressure on your spine Sleep on a firm mattress to further support your spine Strengthen abdominal muscles and your overall core: this will help greatly with your posture, offer more support for your spine, and protect your back When lifting heavy objects, hold the object close to your back and use your legs to lift while maintaining a straight back If you’re pregnant, consider pre-natal massage therapy to help manage sciatica nerve...